Becoming Jewish – by John C. Mannone

            After daddy died, I watched momma slowly convert from Sicilian Catholic to Baltimore Jew when she married Mr. David Morris. I met him long before momma did, at a local pool hall where he was a ball-racker, and bald, like I am now, and he had piercing eyes. I had no idea he would become my father. All I knew about him was that he was a … Continue reading Becoming Jewish – by John C. Mannone

Review of “Station Eleven” by Emily St. John Mandel

Literary sci-fi packed with metaphor, this book itself is proof of its major theme, that the beauty of life makes it worth living, beyond mere survival. The story surrounds two major events: the death of a man, and that of the earth as we know it, with the characters and their storylines sprouting from each. The growth of the two main characters, Jeevan and Kirsten, … Continue reading Review of “Station Eleven” by Emily St. John Mandel

Review of “The Dollhouse Mirror: Poetry by Frank Watson”

Read more: The Dollhouse Mirror: Poetry by Frank Watson The Fine Line Watson, in many of these poems, has found the fine line. The fine line I mean is the moment before, the blankness between living and dying, or the anticipation of doing in the state of nothing. This, I believe, is the ultimate goal of poetry. To find that mirror between reality and impossibility. … Continue reading Review of “The Dollhouse Mirror: Poetry by Frank Watson”

What is Haiku and Does it Matter?

Across many haiku communities people argue about what haiku is. Some people write mostly haiku and attest that you need kigo (season words) or kireji (cutting words). Others believe that you must adhere to “5-7-5″—though most communities have abandoned this syllable count. And then there is senryu. As I understand, senryu is like haiku, except for the way that haiku deals with seasons and nature. … Continue reading What is Haiku and Does it Matter?